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Podcasts

Trump’s Indictment And The Future Of The Republican Party

ePa Live Guest:

Raynard Jackson, a Republican political consultant, lobbyist, and radio host who has served on the presidential campaigns of George H. W. Bush and George W. Bush. Jackson is a native of St. Louis, MO, and is one of the most sought-after conservative speakers in America. He is a frequent public speaker to college students, political & business groups and churches. Jackson has worked on numerous Republican U.S. Senate, gubernatorial, and congressional political campaigns.

He is the president and CEO of Raynard Jackson & Associates, a lobbying firm based in Washington, D.C.  He is a staunch supporter of former President Donald J. Trump and has criticized his critics, including liberal political pundits Joy Reid and Don Lemon, claiming they have done more to hurt Black people than Trump.

Raynard joined ePa Live to discuss the ramifications of the indictment of Trump and gave his predictions about the next presidential election.

Raynard answers ePa Live question of the day:

Raynard Jackson on the ramifications of indicting a former sitting U.S. president:

Raynard Jackson on Tennessee’s House of Representatives expelling two Democratic lawmakers for leading gun control demonstrations from the House floor. Republicans accused the three Democratic lawmakers of bringing “disorder and dishonour to the House”:

Raynard Jackson discusses the 2023 Wisconsin Supreme Court election held on Tuesday, April 4, 2023, to elect a justice to the Wisconsin Supreme Court for a ten-year term. Janet Protasiewicz prevailed in the state’s highly consequential contest for the Supreme Court, which will now be likely to reverse the state’s abortion ban and end the use of gerrymandered legislative maps:

The 2024 presidential election is already shaping up to be one of the most heated political races in American history. Raynard Jackson, Republican political consultant, lobbyist, and radio host offers his predictions on ePa Live:

ePa Live: The Role Of Women & Sisterhood Today

This week on ePa Live:

Nana Malaya; Actress, Dancer, Singer, Storyteller, Poet & Writer Director and founder of the Nubian Institute. Malaya, also known as “The Dancing Diplomat,” is joining ePa Live to discuss her work, women and sisterhood today, as part of Women’s History Month commemoration.

Nana Malaya has been a featured performer in many major venues including The Lincoln Center, The Kennedy Center, The Smithsonian Institute, Discovery Theatre, The Historic Lincoln Theatre, The Aro, The Lianer, The Harlem National Black Theatre & many more! She has toured and graced the stage with Malcolm Jamal Warner, Phyliss Stickney, Phyliss Hyman, Stevie Wonder, Miriam Makeba, Bill T. Jones, Alice Coltrane & numerous others!

Nana Malaya is also a celebrity mom! Her son is Lamman Rucker who began his career on the daytime soap operas As the World Turns and All My Children, before roles in The Temptations, Tyler Perry’s films Why Did I Get Married?, Why Did I Get Married Too?, and Meet the Browns, and its television adaptation.

Sheila Brown, JD, Health & Wellness Coach and Garveyite also joined the talk to discuss the legacy of one of the most important women of the 20th century, Amy Jacques Garvey. Although much is known about her trailblazing husband, Black leader and Pan-Africanist, The Honorable Marcus Mosiah Garvey, not much is known about her own work alongside him that galvanized the Garvey movement and advanced the work of the Universal Negro Improvement Association (UNIA) on a global level. amy jacques garvey

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epa live_panel_03112023

ePa Live: Opining On Our Culture Wars

ePa Live Panelist

  • Ron Carter of The Carter Agency is a Public Relations Consultant, Community Engagement Expert, Film Executive Producer, Marketing Strategist
  • Liyah Brown, Attorney & Advocate, Advancement Project
  • Victor Guildford, Comedian
  • Jeanette Lenoir, Host

TOPIC:

  • Chris Rock Netflix Special, Selective Outrage
  • Jonathan Majors on the cover of Ebony
  • Women’s Day Honorees

    QUESTION OF THE DAY:

    Should the LGBTQ+ community be allowed to march with their pride flags during the St. Patrick’s Day Parade?

    Click the link below to watch the full broadcast:

    https://youtube.com/live/2doFLKJGVsQ?feature=share

    Sabine Becker Speaks:

    The Victor Guildford:

    Ron Carter:

    Liyah Brown, Esq.:

    marcus garvey_quote-epa front page feature

    POTUS, The Time Is NOW To Exonerate Marcus Garvey

    BY JEANETTE LENOIR

    Dr. Julius Garvey made another plea for the exoneration of his father, The Honorable Marcus Mosiah Garvey. He says the push to clear his father’s name has been ignored during every administration since the exoneration movement started in the 1970s, including by the Obama administration when he thought they had a good chance to restore his father’s record and good name in Congress with help from the Congressional Black Caucus. Now, in his sunset years, the last living son of Marcus Garvey, a civil rights icon, staunch pan Africanist and Black freedom legend, is determined as ever to see this exoneration movement through.

    “Can we do it? We can do it. We shall do it!” his father once exclaimed to galvanize Black people all over the world to work for their own freedom and self-determination. “Any leadership that teaches you to depend upon another race, is a leadership that will enslave you.” – Marcus Garvey 

    This Black History Month, let us rededicate our efforts to request an official response from the White House and President Biden for a posthumous exoneration of the Rt. Honorable Marcus Garvey for his unjust persecution and imprisonment by the U.S. government in 1923.

    As time goes by, will President Biden and his administration finally hear the call to exonerate Marcus Garvey?

    Please join the movement and help exonerate Marcus Garvey: justice4garvey.org

    “God and nature first made us what we are, and then out of our own created genius we make ourselves what we want to be. Follow always that great law. Let the sky and God be our limit and eternity our measurement.” Marcus Garvey

    iranian women protest

    Implicit Bias And Iran’s George Floyd Movement

    GUESTS:

    • Evon M. ErvinOneida County Legislator, D-20
      • Implicit Bias
    • Mateo Mohammad Farzaneh, associate professor of history at Northeastern Illinois University
      • Iranian Women’s Revolution
      • Book: Iranian Women and Gender in the Iran-Iraq War

    iranian women

    The Red Wave That Couldn’t Make A Splash

    BY JEANETTE LENOIR

    Join us! My guests this Saturday are: Billy Buntin, Storyteller and former CNN Producer; Bradford Kane, Author, Pitchfork Populism and Ron Carter, NABJ Treasurer, The Carter Agency.

    Our discussion will focus on the following hot topics: 2022 Midterm Elections, Elon’s Twitter,  Censoring Kyrie & Ye, Tiffany Cross Firing, and JLo Choosing JAff.

    Maroon Day: A Celebration Of Ignorance And Black Subjugation

    BY JEANETTE LENOIR

    Today is “Maroon Day” in Suriname.  At display, a moral paradox of a nation that chooses to celebrate Black people as subhuman. A so called Caribbean nation sits atop this despicable display of ignorance and inhumanity. Make no mistake, today’s “celebration” is to further demote us, Tribal people, descents of escaped enslaved Africans, to the level of cattle, hogs and chickens. With guidance from those who uphold the system of white supremacy, Suriname is still forcing the “Maroon” identity upon a certain group of Black people.

    “The word ‘Maroon’ — Marron to the French — has come to be used as a generic term to designate fugitive slaves from plantations in the New World, although the Iberians had their own designations. The etymology is uncertain, but consensus opinion would seem to accept the view that it derives from the Spanish word cimarron, which originally referred to domestic cattle that had escaped to a wild existence. In the course of time, however, the term lost its faunal connotation to embrace runaway slaves almost exclusively. As cimarron would seem to be a peculiarly New World term, first applied in Hispaniola, so also is its derivative, Maroon when applied to runaway slaves. As far as Jamaica is concerned, the official documents, as well as early works on the island, did not make use of the term until well into the eighteenth century. – Mavis C. Campbell wrote in her book, The Maroons Of Jamaica 1655 – 1796.

    There’s no doubt, today’s so called celebration in Suriname is a display of white might and supremacy in the western world carried out by misguided Black people and other POC. This display of national ignorance is a stark and unfortunate reminder that we, Black people, still live separately; in the fields and in the masters’ house, symbolically. And as long as our minds stay chained to the lies told of our people and their contributions to civilization as we know it, true freedom will remain an asterisk in our fight to regain our rightful place on earth.

    The assault on our humanity is a global effort. In America this white supremacist language was spoken with the Three-fifths Compromise in the Constitution and in subsequent laws that still govern this land. Americans are still working to overcome and write a new chapter in our human story, with persistent pushback and a death grip on our fruitful racism. It’s high time to stop using the term Maroon, its meaning clearly inhumane and deeply offensive, to identify an ancient people, my African people, all over the world. In America James Baldwin cried out, I AM NOT YOUR NEGRO. In Suriname African Tribal people are echoing the same sentiment; I AM NOT YOUR MAROON.

    Dr. John Henrik Clarke said, “Africans brought the world its first humanity.” And though a heavy burden, it is clear we must continue to remind the world what it means to be human and not a “Maroon.”

    Before George Floyd There Was The Uncommon Case Of Daniel Brown

    BY JEANETTE LENOIR

    “Social advance depends as much upon the process through which it is secured as upon the result itself.” – Jane Addams

    It took a tragic incident during a festive gathering in 1875 to bring about change in American policing. And Daniel Brown, like George Floyd, was the catalyst that shifted the relationship between citizens and police in Baltimore; citizens concerned for their civil rights and the police for their authority to enter private homes.

    Brown, a proud freeman and home owner, “provided the context in which [he] confronted Officer McDonald,” Shufelt writes, in an effort to find justification or make sense of the racial circumstances that led to him being clubbed and shot to death by the officer.  Brown, through the lens of the white immigrant cop from Ireland, forgot his place in America’s social order when he defended his humanity after the officer came knocking on his door for a noise complaint. And because of deep-rooted and long-standing racial conflicts in America Brown is portrayed in the media and the pages of history as a “too proud Black man” partly responsible for his death.

    “But Daniel Brown’s individual response to a situation he perceived as an affront to his dignity as a freeman and the proprietor of his own home played a role in the tragedy,” writes Shufelt, and,  “The evidence shows that in his daily life Daniel Brown was in the habit of standing up for his rights with enough self-assurance to get the attention of his white acquaintances.”

    This is the story of Daniel Brown. A proud American who knew his civil rights, stood up for himself and others, and was brutally beaten and shot to death for it by a police officer sworn to defend these rights. Nonetheless, the unjustified and brutal murder of Brown by Officer McDonald changed the course in American history when the white police officer was convicted of killing him.

    Although the small gathering at this proud freeman’s home proved to be fatal for him, ending the life he’d diligently planned for himself and his wife, Keziah, Daniel Brown left behind a powerful legacy we see in civil rights movements like The Black Panther Party and Black Lives Matter.  And that’s a life well-lived, no matter how it ended.

    A conversation with the author, Gordon H. Shufelt:

    In The Uncommon Case of Daniel Brown, readers travel through praiseworthy hills and deplorable valleys of our American culture, landing squarely on a pivotal societal curve, when a white police officer gets convicted of killing a Black citizen.

    The Uncommon Case of Daniel Brown can be purchased on Amazon or via the link below:

    https://www.kentstateuniversitypress.com/2020/uncommon-case-of-daniel-brown/

    Philips: U.S. Constitution Key Pivot To The Formation Of The Modern World

    Editor’s Note: The views expressed are solely those of the author. James D.R. Philips is an Australian attorney and the author of the new book, “Two Revolutions and the Constitution: How the English and American Revolutions Produced the American Constitution.”
     
     

    Australia probably isn’t the first place Americans think of on Independence Day, but it’s important to consider the many ways America’s example has reverberated around the world for centuries. Thomas Jefferson’s Declaration of Independence of July 4, 1776, had three great consequences for Australia. First, it prompted the founding of a British colony there. Second, it facilitated Australian independence. Third, it led to the structure of the Australian Constitution. American independence meant that the British could no longer send convicts to its former American colonies. Long-stay prisons in Britain were in short supply. The British needed a new colony to which they could transport convicts. They risked the moonshot of trying to establish a colony on the other side of the world, at Botany Bay (now in Sydney).

    The success of the revolutionary war and Declaration of independence taught the British not to resist a settler colony whose people wanted independence. When Australians demanded independence, just over a century after the founding of the first Australian colony, the British did not stand in their way. The independence led to the Constitution. The Constitution (drafted while the First Fleet was hazarding its epic journey from Portsmouth in England to establish the new colony in Australia) had a profound influence on the structure and terms of the Australian Constitution, and therefore on Australia’s system of government.

    Of course, a future Australia was not on his mind when Jefferson was drafting the declaration. He and other Founders were focused on protecting their legal and political rights from British predation. The Founders charged King George III with tyranny. They rebelled, left his kingdom and established a republic. Charles I suffered a similar fate, charged with tyranny by the Rump Parliament. He was tried and beheaded in 1649, and a British republic established. The American republic has endured.

    The English republic was short-lived. But some 30 years after the end of the English republic, the English had a second revolution, called either the “English Revolution” or the “Glorious Revolution.” The English (with substantial Dutch help) forced James II to flee his kingdom, rather than putting him on trial and executing him. The English Revolution established finally that the monarch was subject to Parliament and to law. During the English Revolution, there were rebellions against English rule in Massachusetts, New York, and Maryland.

    The English Revolution was a foundation of the development of pluralistic societies, which enjoyed freedom and representative government subject to law in England and America. The American Revolution further developed and cemented these principles and had a profound effect on the development of the modern world. The Founders believed that they were protecting their existing legal and political rights. Their conception of those rights developed in the British-American colonial period. There was plenty of scope for different perceptions in America and in England as to the extent of British control of aspects of colonial government, and to what extent American rights were subject to the King’s prerogative power or subject to Parliamentary legislation.

    When, some 80 years after the English Revolution, George III and his Parliament began imposing taxes on Americans and seeking to increase British control over the colonies, Americans rebelled against Parliament as well as against the king. They believed that Parliament had abandoned its role as the protector of liberties against royal overreach. Most famously, colonial Americans believed that Parliament could not impose direct taxes on them because there could be no taxation without representation, and Americans were not represented in Parliament.

    The American Bill of Rights was essential in the minds of many Americans because of the risk that Congress might betray the people, as Parliament had betrayed them. To Americans, the developing British concept of parliamentary supremacy had become a latent source of tyranny. Australia’s Constitution is largely a hybrid of the American and British models, using the American federal and national structure, but establishing Parliamentary supremacy (subject to that structure).

    The most famous statement in the U.S. Declaration of Independence is universal in its aspiration: “That all [people] are created equal; that they are endowed by their Creator with certain unalienable rights; that among these are life, liberty, and the pursuit of happiness.” Making these rights real and operable for all Americans is a work in progress. Still, it is momentous that the declaration stated in such compelling language that these rights were inherent and that when the British impeded them, Americans had a right to rebel. The declaration is a foundation of America. And it has a profound significance for Australians: It is one of Australia’s founding documents, too.